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CFIA releases updated regulations governing animal transport

Planned changes to Canada's Health of Animals Regulations governing the transport of animals have now been made public.

22 February 2019, at 11:21am

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has unveiled the changes to Canada's Health of Animals Regulations governing the transport of animals that will come into effect one year from now.

Dr Jaspinder Komal, Canada's Chief Veterinary Officer, says the changes are based on extensive consultations and consider international standards, consumer expectations, current animal transport practices, existing infrastructure, geographic realities and animal transport logistics.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has unveiled the changes to Canada's Health of Animals Regulations governing the transport of animals that will come into effect one year from now.

In an interview with Farmscape.Ca, Dr Jaspinder Komal, Canada's Chief Veterinary Officer, says the changes are based on extensive consultations and consider international standards, consumer expectations, current animal transport practices, existing infrastructure, geographic realities and animal transport logistics.

Dr Komal explains: “These new stronger regulations will better protect animal welfare now and in the future.

“They introduce a balance of prescriptive and outcome-based requirements that emphasise and improve the health and wellbeing of the animals during the entire transportation process.

“We've also entered definitions and key requirements, including employee training, to help regulated parties better understand what is expected of them.

“Above all, animals need to arrive at their destinations safely and be suitably fed, hydrated and rested.

“These regulations go beyond transport journey time to cover the entire time an animal is prepared for transit to the time they arrive in their new locations.

“We focused on the feed, water and rest times to be specific to the needs of different types of animals and the times stated in the regulations are the maximum allowed times.

“However, the responsibility is on the operator. If, at any time during the trip, the operator believes the animals require feed, water or rest, he or she has the flexibility and the obligation to stop and provide the animal the necessary requirements.”

For more on the planned changes visit inspection.gc.ca/humane.