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Tougher Rules on Feeding Pigs Waste Food Needed

by 5m Editor
22 December 2011, at 6:26am

NEW ZEALAND - New Zealand Pork has told the Government it needs to strengthen the regulations that control the feeding of waste food to pigs.

In a briefing to the Government, the organisation says a MAF review three years ago noted the ministry's inability to effectively monitor compliance with biosecurity rules covering the practice.

NZ Pork says one pig disease, post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome, is thought to have been introduced through feeding uncooked waste food to pigs.

According to Radio New Zealand News, it says it's also a recognised pathway for spreading exotic diseases such as foot and mouth, swine fever and PRRS or Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome.

However, it says so far there has been only one prosecution for breaching the regulations.

NZ Pork says the main risk lies with small scale non-commercial piggeries.

It says it is clear that more effective regulation is needed to minimise the risk.

The industry is also still waiting to hear the outcome of its High Court challenge of MAF's revised import health standards that would allow limited imports of fresh uncooked pig meat from countries that have the PRRS disease.

PRRS can cause abortions, and respiratory complaints in pigs and kill piglets.

Further Reading

- Find out more information on the diseases mentioned in this article by clicking here.
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