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NPB Comment on USDA's 'My Plate' Food Icon

by 5m Editor
3 June 2011, at 10:07am

US - The National Pork Board appreciates the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) unveiling of a new food guide icon designed to help make following current dietary recommendations easier.

The announcement is an important step in improving the health of Americans, and the National Pork Board also appreciates the overall goals of the Dietary Guidelines to reduce obesity, encourage the consumption of healthful meals and increase physical activity.

Understanding that protein is a core element of an overall healthy plate, and that cuts of lean, fresh pork can readily be paired with fruits, vegetables and whole grains is an actionable message for consumers. Pork offers a familiar, affordable and delicious way to meet the dietary recommendations. With the recently announced lower USDA cooking temperature for pork, it is easier than ever to prepare lean pork without overcooking.

Nutritionally, pork provides vital nutrients such as heme iron and vitamin B12, which many Americans lack.[1],[2] Plus, research shows that eating lean meats such as pork can support weight loss and weight management by reducing hunger sensations, increasing feelings of fullness and preserving lean muscle mass.[3],[4] As a Nutrition Communications Network partner of the USDA, the National Pork Board looks forward to working with the USDA to help educate Americans on choosing, preparing and eating healthier food options, including consuming lean proteins such as pork as a cornerstone of the plate.

[1] Allen, L. How common is vitamin B-12 deficiency? American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2009. 89(suppl):693S–6S.

[2] Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. D2-14.

[3] Aubertin-Leheudre M, Adlercreutz H. Relationship between animal protein intake and muscle mass index in healthy women. Brit J Nutr. 2009;102:1803-1810.

[4] Leidy H, Tang M, Armstrong C, Martin C, Campbell W. The effects of consuming frequent, higher protein meals on appetite and satiety during weight loss in overweight/obese men. Obesity. 2011;19:818-824