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EU to Buy Pork to Prevent Price Slump

by 5m Editor
24 January 2011, at 9:44am

GERMANY - The European Union will start buying stocks of pork, to counteract the slump in its price after the Dioxin contamination scandal in Germany, the EU Commissioner for Agriculture, Dacian Ciolos, quoted by Money.ro, stated on Saturday in Berlin.

Pork sales in Germany, the biggest market in Europe, dropped steeply after this month’s Dioxin contamination alert. As a consequence, the price of Germany-produced pork dropped by 25 per cent, up to EUR 1.12/ kilo, when purchased from the producer.

“Brussels will offer incentives to farmers who stock on pork, in suitable storage conditions, to be sold when prices revert to normal values,” Mr Ciolos explained, adding that an official announcement to this effect would soon be made by the Commission.

Nine O'clock reports that the EU official promised that he would raise this issue in the Agriculture Ministers’ Council, to take place today.

"The German government's measures have helped to restore confidence to the market," said Mr Ciolos adding that Brussels would act if these proved inadequate.

The latest scandal was caused when a German firm supplied some 3,000 tonnes of fatty acids contaminated with cancer-causing dioxins to several animal feed makers.

Thousands of farms have been temporarily closed, and traces of dioxin have been found in eggs, poultry and pork. Several countries have since banned the import of German products.

Last Saturday the president of the German Farmers' Association (DVB), Gerd Sonnleitner, said the price producers get for pork had dropped from between €1.40 to €1.50 a kilo down to €1.12 a kilo.

According to The Local, European agriculture ministers will meet Monday in Brussels to discuss the problem, with French minister Bruno Le Maire, also in Berlin, demanding immediate action.

French pig farmers were in an untenable situation, he said, calling for high-level discussions on the future of the industry, a move supported by Mr Ciolos.