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Action Taken to Strengthen Competitiveness

by 5m Editor
19 January 2009, at 7:15am

UK - After an excellent outcome of last year’s financial statements, Tulip Ltd. continues to strengthen competitiveness.

Danish Crown’s subsidiary in the UK is now commencing a consultation process with the employees on closing the sites in Thetford and Bromborough and the slaughtering department in Linton.

"Through the years we have strengthened our position in a strong competitive market in the UK – lately with the acquisition of the meat processing company Geo Adams & Sons. However, we must look to the future and currently focus on reducing costs and by closing the sites in question, we will achieve considerable efficiency savings," says Carsten Jakobsen, Vice President of Danish Crown.

In connection with the reorganisations it is our intension to transfer production to other sites within Tulip Ltd. to reach full capacity of the continuing sites.

A great part of production on the Thetford site has previously been transferred to other sites. Production of fried bacon will now be transferred to the Bodmin site where production of similar products is already taking place which means final closure of production at the Thetford site. The Bromborough site produces boiled and sliced cooked meats and production from here will be transferred to the site in Boston. In Linton the closure concerns the slaughtering department which will be transferred to Tulip Ltd.’s slaughterhouse in Spalding. Other activities in Linton including the sausage department and prepacking of fresh meats will remain here.

In connection with the closures the management will now commence a consultation process with the employee representatives according to the rules applying in the UK.

"It is always unfortunate to have to say goodbye to skilled employees, however, together with the representatives for the employees we will work on finding solutions for the employees potentially impacted," says Carsten Jakobsen.