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JSR brings the world to Yorkshire

by 5m Editor
21 June 2007, at 2:48pm

UK - Britain's leading pig breeding company, JSR Genetics, welcomed delegates from around the world to a two day World Partners Conference in Yorkshire. Delegates from ten countries including Japan, South Korea and The Netherlands came together as part of JSR's growing franchise business, which now operates in over 20 countries.

Under the theme "Making Pork more Profitable" delegates undertook a wide range of activities including updates on JSR's extensive portfolio of research projects. Led by a team of world- renowned academics, they also took part in workshops on prolificacy, growth, disease resistance and meat eating quality.

: Delegates at the recent JSR World Partners Conference held at the Southburn Offices Training Centre, Yorkshire

Dr. Tsunetoyo Ban from Japan commented, "We have a sophisticated pork industry in Japan but, like everyone here, we are seeking ways to better meet market opportunities for quality pork and how we can produce this pork more efficiently. This group represents an immense amount of knowledge and allows us to talk as one business, sharing our experience and isolating the key factors that will make a difference to our futures".

Tim Rymer, JSR's Chairman who, together with the delegates, enjoyed an 'international' banquet in the grounds of Southburn House, saw this first World Partners Conference as an opportunity to bring the global pork industry together. "We have seen our franchise businesses grow rapidly over the last three years and this conference provided an ideal environment in which to unite everyone. Our strategy continues to build upon our strong UK business with discussions taking place in a number of Eastern European and South American countries. We intend to help our partners grow their businesses so that they will have a greater presence at the next World Partners Conference in 2009.

5m Editor