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Eliminating Meat and Bone Meal from Pig Feed Viewed as a Marketing Matter

by 5m Editor
7 November 2003, at 12:00am

CANADA - Farm-Scape: Episode 1380. Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork.

Manitoba Pork Council


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Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork

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Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council
and Sask Pork.

Farm-Scape, Episode 1380

Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development says it's important to recognize the phasing out of the use of meat and bone meal in swine diets is strictly a marketing decision.

Since the May 20th announcement of the discovery of a single case of BSE in one Western Canadian cattle herd, the use of rendered meat and bone meal products in livestock feed has come under intense scrutiny.

One major Canadian processor has announced that, as of December 31, 2003, it will not be accepting any pigs that have had meat and bone meal included in their diets and Ontario Pork is discouraging its producers from using meat and bone meal.

Technology Transfer Specialist Jennifer Hannesson says all are quick to point out the decision is based strictly on the demands of consumers.

"Every organization that makes a comment about meat and bone meal is that this decision to remove it as a feed ingredient option is not a food safety issue.

Meat and bone meal does not pose a food safety risk with pork or within pigs. The science shows that meat and bone meal is not a food safety risk so it is just purely market driven.

Some major foreign consumers do not want to have meat and bone meal fed to the pigs that they're ultimately getting the pork from and, to be able to ensure that we are able to sell to this market, is the major force in this decision being made by some of the processors".

Hannesson points out the Canadian Food Inspection Agency continues to approve the feeding of meat and bone meal to pigs and other non ruminant animals.

Scientific studies have found no evidence that pigs carry or transmit transmissible spongiform encephalopathy.

In experiments where pigs were fed large does of brain tissue from infected cattle the pigs failed become infected.

For Farmscape.Ca, I'm Bruce Cochrane.

5m Editor