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CPC Investigating Factors Contributing to Increased Hog Exports South

by 5m Editor
17 September 2003, at 12:00am

CANADA - Farm-Scape: Episode 1344. Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork.

Manitoba Pork Council


Farm-Scape is sponsored by
Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork

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Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council
and Sask Pork.

Farm-Scape, Episode 1344

The President of the Canadian Pork Council says urgent action is needed to deal with the increased number of Canadian hogs being shipped south for slaughter.

Last week representatives of the Canadian Pork Council met with their American and Mexican counterparts to discuss issues of common concern.

One issue that emerged as key on both sides of the Canada US border is the escalating number of Canadian hogs being slaughtered in American plants.

CPC President Edouard Asnong says increased Canadian production, the value of the Canadian dollar and the effect of BSE have been recognized as some of the reasons but the issue requires detailed examination.

"Firstly we have to find out what all the factors are and, as soon as that is done, define what are the solutions that we can bring to it.

We do not have much control on the exchange rate or the value of our dollar but certainly we have to anticipate if there are other movements of the dollar.

Can we address something now or at least let the industry in Canada know that we have to stay competitive on the farms and also in the different processing plants.

We are going to talk to our packers to make them more sensitive to the issue and look at their side, what can they do to improve their competitiveness and to make sure that more hogs are processed in this country".

Asnong says, in an effort develop a common understanding, the Canadian Pork Council has agreed to investigate the situation and to report back to the Americans.

He says the CPC has already begun discussing the situation with Canadian processors.

He says the matter is considered urgent and, while no firm timelines have been set, he considers it to be a matter of days or weeks rather than months or years.

For Farmscape.Ca, I'm Bruce Cochrane.

5m Editor