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Canadian Pork Council Plans Traceability Studies

by 5m Editor
7 May 2003, at 12:00am

CANADA - Farm-Scape: Episode 1236. Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork.

Manitoba Pork Council


Farm-Scape is sponsored by
Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork

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Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council
and Sask Pork.

Farm-Scape, Episode 1236

The Canadian Pork Council is planning pilot studies aimed at developing a system for tracking hogs through the production and processing chain.

Identification and traceability has emerged as a key issue for Canadian pork producers. Canadian Pork Council Hog Production Analyst Eric Aubin says a number of identification and traceability means being used in other countries have been examined but it's uncertain whether these experiences can be transferred to Canadian conditions.

"The pork producers are exploring the possibility of conducting pilot studies where identification means and traceability means would be tested for their cost in terms of infrastructure and labor, in terms of effectiveness and in terms of retention and readability of the tags. We have identified permanent identification means that can be applicable for swine.

When the hogs are leaving the farrowing site, we've identified two systems that could work. One is the manual ear tattoo and one is a visual tag.

When they leave the nursery, we're going look at a visual tag also an automatic shoulder tattoo and a shoulder slap tattoo.

These are the three that we have identified when they exit the nursery.

When they leave the grower finisher site we're going to look at the shoulder slap tattoo. We're also going to look at two electronic identification means, one being half duplex and the other being full duplex, which the hogs could keep for their entire life."

Aubin says the hope is to begin these pilot studies in the fall. He estimates the studies will require the participation of about 36 farms and three or four slaughterhouses.

For Farmscape.Ca, I'm Bruce Cochrane.

5m Editor