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Eradication of PRRS

by 5m Editor
12 June 2006, at 12:00am

By the University of Minnesota Swine Extension - At this time, elimination of PRRS virus from infected farms is possible by 4 primary methods.

  1. Whole herd-depopulation/repopulation
  2. Test and removal
  3. Herd closure and rollover
  4. Production of negative pigs from positive sows
Advantages and disadvantages of each method are as follows:

1. Whole herd depopulation repopulation

Advantages:

  • High degree of efficacy
  • Solves multiple disease problems at the same time
  • Results in genetic improvement
  • Vast experience of veterinary industry
Disadvantages:
  • Costly
  • Requires multiple sites for off-site breeding of new clean stock and finishing out of diseased pigs
  • Re-infection can occur during repopulation process

2. Test and Removal

Advantages:

  • High degree of efficacy
  • Low risk, due to speed of the testing process
Disadvantages:
  • Testing cost can be high if ELISA and PCR are used to test sera
  • Requires removal of exposed breeding animals
  • Feasible only in herds with low (<10%) seroprevalence in breeding herd

3. Herd closure and rollover

Advantages:

  • Initial efficacy appears promising
  • Does not require excessive testing or removal of breeding animals
Disadvantages:
  • Requires off site breeding facilities
  • Requires a long time to complete
  • Relies on consistent natural exposure of all replacement gilts and a lack of PRRSV transmission in the breeding herd over time.
  • Questionable if this can be accomplished in all cases.

4. Production of negative pigs from positive sows

Advantages:

  • Preserves genetics
  • Can improve overall health status of offspring through the use of medication or specific vaccinations
  • Improvements in health and performance of offspring can be significant
Disadvantages:
  • Transmission of PRRSV from dam to offspring can result in production of infected batches of weaners
Source: University of Minnesota Swine Extension - May 2006

University of Minnesota Swine Extension